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2 edition of Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the ideal information retrieval test collection found in the catalog.

Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the ideal information retrieval test collection

H. Gilbert

Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the ideal information retrieval test collection

by H. Gilbert

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  • 39 Currently reading

Published by British Library, Research and Development Department in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reproduction of report: Cambridge: Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1979.

StatementH. Gilbert and K. Sparck Jones.
SeriesResearch and development reports / British Library -- no. 5481, British Library research and development reports -- no.5481.
ContributionsSparck Jones, K. 1935-
The Physical Object
Pagination1 microfiche (93 frames)
Number of Pages93
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13944068M

  As Section mentioned, a test document collection should contain a set of information needs, as well as relevance assessments between each document and each information need. In this case, since each document is further partitioned into several passages, the relevance assessment between each passage and each information need is therefore needed. test and their use should be discontinued for measuring the significance of a difference between means. Categories and Subject Descriptors H[Information Storageand Retrieval]: Information Search and Retrieval General Terms Experimentation Keywords Statistical significance, hypothesis test, sign, Wilcoxon, Stu-.

  Statistical significance testing is widely accepted as a means to assess how well a difference in effectiveness reflects an actual difference between systems, as opposed to random noise because of the selection of topics. According to recent surveys on SIGIR, CIKM, ECIR and TOIS papers, the t-test is the most popular choice among IR researchers. Evaluating Information: Validity, Reliability, Accuracy, Triangulation Teaching and learning objectives: 1. To consider why information should be assessed 2. To understand the distinction between ‘primary’ and ‘secondary sources’ of information 3. To learn what is meant by the validity, reliability, and accuracy of information 4.

  1. Introduction. The experimental evaluation of Information Retrieval (IR) systems relies on a well-known and widely established methodology, dating back to the Cranfield experiments in the s and usually referred to as TREC-like evaluation (see, e.g., Sanderson () for a recent survey). One issue in current TREC-like test collection initiatives is the cost related to relevance. Introduction to Information Retrieval 6 Measuring relevance §Three elements: 1.A benchmark document collection 2.A benchmark suite of queries assessment of either Relevantor Nonrelevantfor each query and each document Sec.


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Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the ideal information retrieval test collection by H. Gilbert Download PDF EPUB FB2

Assessing relevance To properly evaluate a system, your test information needs must be germane to the documents in the test document collection, and appropriate for predicted usage of the system. These information needs are best designed by domain experts.

This Report concerns the statistical basis of relevance assessment for information retrieval experiment, with special reference to the proposed 'ideal1 information retrieval test collection. That is, it considers statistical arguments, or methods, for establishing what assessment information is required in given circumstances, from which actual.

H. Gilbert, K. Sparck Jones, Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the ‘ideal’ information retrieval test collection. Technical report, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, British Library Research and Development Report No. () Google ScholarAuthor: Tetsuya Sakai.

Statistical Bases of Relevance Assessment for the ‘IDEAL’ Information Retrieval Test Collection. Gilbert, K. Sparck Jones Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, British Library Research and Development Report No.Preface; Summary; Section A: The ‘ideal’ test collection and obtaining relevance assessments for it.

Al Introduction: the 'ideal1 information retrieval test collection A2 The 'ideal' collection specification A3 Relevance data A4 Constraints on statistical methods page SI Al Al A2 A3 A4 Section B: Bl 1. B2 2. 1 2 2. 2 2 2 B3 3 3 3. B4 4. B5 B6 Section C CI C2 2. 2, 1 2 Statistical methods of determining relevance assess.

Statistical significance testing is widely accepted as a means to assess how well a difference in effectiveness reflects an actual difference between systems, as opposed to random noise because of the selection of topics. According to recent surveys on SIGIR, CIKM, ECIR and TOIS papers, the t-test is the most popular choice among IR researchers.

However, previous work has suggested computer. Sanderson, M.: Test collection based evaluation of information retrieval systems. Foundations and Trends in Information Retrieval 4, – () CrossRef zbMATH Google Scholar H.

Gilbert and K. Jones. Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the 'ideal' information retrieval test collection. Technical report, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, BL R&D Report Google Scholar; 5.

Harman. Overview of the first TREC conference. Gilbert G and Sparck Jones K () Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the ‘Ideal’ information retrieval test collection. BL R&D ReportCambridge, England.

Kageura K, Koyama T, Yoshioka M, Takasu A, Nozue T and Tsuji K (). The dominant approach to evaluate the effectiveness of information retrieval (IR) systems is by means of reusable test collections built following the Cranfield paradigm. In this paper, we propose a new IR evaluation methodology based on pooled test-collections and on the continuous use of either crowdsourcing or professional editors to obtain relevance judgements.

Test Collection Based Evaluation of Information Retrieval Systems Mark Sanderson The Information School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK [email protected] Abstract Use of test collections and evaluation measures to assess the effective-ness of information retrieval systems has its origins in work dating back to the early s.

Bibliography Test Collection Based Evaluation of Information Retrieval Systems – M. Sanderson TREC – Experiment and Evaluation in Information Retrieval – E. Voorhees, D. Harman (eds.) On the history of evaluation in IR – S.

Robertson,Journal of Information Science A Comparison of Statistical Significance Tests for. Building large relevance datasets is important for the training and evaluation of Information Retrieval (IR) systems. This process involves the collection of documents, queries and assessors.

Standard test collections Here is a list of the most standard test collections and evaluation series. We focus particularly on test collections for ad hoc information retrieval system evaluation, but also mention a couple of similar test collections for text classification.

The Cranfield collection. This was the pioneering test collection in. To measure ad hoc information retrieval effectiveness in the standard way, we need a test collection consisting of three things: A document collection A test suite of information needs, expressible as queries A set of relevance judgments, standardly a binary assessment of either relevant or nonrelevant for each query-document pair.

Test collections are perhaps the most widely used tool for evaluating the effectiveness of information retrieval (IR) technologies. Test collections consist of a set of topics or information need descriptions, a set of information objects to be searched, and relevance judgments indicating which objects are relevant for which topics.

In this paper, we propose a new IR evaluation methodology based on pooled test-collections and on the continuous use of either crowdsourcing or professional editors to obtain relevance judgements. Instead of building a static collection for a finite set of systems known a priori, we propose an IR evaluation paradigm where retrieval approaches.

For a system-based information retrieval evaluation, test collection model still remains as a costly task. Producing relevance judgments is an expensive, time consuming task which has to be performed by human assessors.

It is not viable to assess the relevancy of every single document in a corpus against each topic for a large collection. Statistical Language Models for Information Retrieval A Critical Review ChengXiang Zhai is based on a retrieval model, which formalizes the notion of relevance they can be justified based on relevance.

In Section 4, we review work on extending and. For a system-based information retrieval evaluation, test collection model still remains as a costly task. Producing relevance judgments is an expensive, time consuming task which has to be.

Gilbert, H. and Spärck Jones, K.(), Statistical bases of relevance assessment for the 'ideal' information retrieval test collection, British Library Research and Development ReportComputer Laboratory, University of Cambridge. Google Scholar.from book The Information Retrieval Series yet this is the factor affecting the user's relevance assessment.

Therefore, in this survey, we describe how statistical models can process.Information retrieval (IR) researchers commonly use three tests of statistical significance: the Student's paired t-test, the Wilcoxon signed rank test, and the sign test.